Beyond Disney : Five Grimm Fairy Tales you probably don’t know.

3887437683_429851956b_z‘If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.’ – Albert Einstein

I’m taking a slight departure from picture book reviews today to talk about fairy tales. As a German teacher, and former college professor, I’ve spent a lot of time with fairy tales — teaching the history of the Grimm brothers and their collection of the folk tales handed down in oral tradition as well as the literary fairy tales of the Romantic movement with their intricate tales of madness. Then of course, there are the Disney adaptations with all the blood and violence stripped out, and the marvelous modern re-tellings which turn expected norms on their ears and put familiar characters in diverse new settings.

I read aloud to my kids every night and we’ve done Harry Potter, Narnia, Percy Jackson and many other series, but I thought I’d take a break and pull my “Complete Grimm’s Fairy Tales” off the shelf. The boys appreciate hearing a story from start to finish in one night (another perk of picture books!) and I’m ashamed to admit I never read the boys many fairy tales when they were little. We’re avoiding the old standby tales like Snow White and Cinderella (even though the original Grimm versions are much more exciting and bloody) in favor for a few of the obscure ones I discovered in graduate school and often use in my teaching.

So come with me and explore a few stories which deserve way more attention than they’ve been given by “mainstream media:”

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Birthday boy’s choice: Picture book reviews

20180311_175029.jpgMy son is turning 9 today, March 12th! He knows his mom is a writer and I’ve dragged him through the children’s section of enough libraries and bookstores for him to develop a bit of an appreciation for picture books. He was excited when I told him I was featuring HIS choices in my picture book reviews today. So, we are taking a departure from my normal rule of keeping the book reviews current and I present for you five of my son’s very favorites! (like me, he has WAY more than five favorites, but some of them I’ve already reviewed, so we settled on these). Instead of MY favorite part, I will include my SON’s favorite part of the book.

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There’s always time for picture books!

ReviewBooksFeb2018Life has been busy at the Schreibenfreude house:  I’m a coach for my school’s Speech & Debate team which has recently wrapped up a very successful season, winning awards at States and qualifying two students for Nationals, my kids (and the ones I teach) have been busy with school projects, and if that weren’t enough, we’re currently looking to get a dog– which has taken up a good bit of research time that’s normally spent researching my writing!  On the bright side, this is school vacation week here in Maine, and that means more time for writing and reading picture books! Let’s go!

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It’s all been done…breaking writer’s block

So, writers: ever get the feeling that it’s pointless to write because surely everything worth writing has already been written? Do you ever get a feeling of existential dread in bookstores or libraries (which are supposed to be such heavenly and inspiring places) wondering why you should write, because there are already enough books on those shelves to last a lifetime? Just me?

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Canadian Content: A Bookstore and two Canadian Classics

KIMG2815My husband is from Canada, so every other year we spend the holidays with his family in Ontario and usually take some of that time to sight-see with the children in Toronto. This year I asked Twitter for some good Independent bookstore recommendations and of those, we were able to visit “Mabel’s Fables” on Mt. Pleasant, a true gem of a bookstore specializing in children’s books. To give you a brief review, I’ll adapt my normal “picture book review” categories:

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Guest Post from the “Letters from the Heart” project

OldLettersHi Blog readers!

It’s been a few weeks since I posted– the life of a teacher who is also a parent and a writer gets that way sometimes! Today I’m excited to share with you a piece of a wonderful writing project spearheaded by a good friend of mine. It’s called “Letters from the Heart,” and the concept is simple:  if you could send an anonymous letter to someone (even to yourself), who would it be? What do you want to say that you can’t bring yourself to say or write? A great group of writers (and me) have contributed letters so far. The hope is that these letters will not only be cathartic for those who write them, but even more that they will resonate with those who read them and recognize similar feelings in their own lives. Maybe some of you will even be inspired to write your own letter– whether you send it to this project or actually send it to a real recipient.

Those of us writing for the project have decided to undertake a “Blog hop” to promote the letters– each of us has chosen a letter we did not write but which we found personally significant to publish in our blogs. I hope you enjoy this one (which has special meaning for me as I know many cancer survivors– you probably do too) and that you will go check out more at heartshapedletters.wordpress.com. To contribute your own anonymous letter, contact G.K. Sihat at gksihat@gmail.com.

And now, I bring you, “Letter to my bald head.”

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It’s not about me…

And now, a slight break from my  typical posts:

OvidQuoteThere’s a movement on Facebook and Twitter right now for women to come forward using the hashtag #metoo if they have been sexually harassed or assaulted and the volume of posts is staggering– from all ages and walks of life. It’s heartbreaking. I stand in solidarity with all women and men who are harassed for their gender, sexual orientation, race, etc.  I am lucky enough to come from that tiny bit of the population who actually has never been sexually harassed or assaulted. Never. At least not in any way I can remember. So, while I am really not trying to make this “about me” it’s inevitable for me to think about that.  We all relate movements to our own lives and experiences. So here are some thoughts:

It’s not about me, but…every man that degrades women by valuing them for their looks also degrades those whom he does NOT explicitly speak to by implying they are not worthy of being paid attention to. How many jobs did I not even get an interview for because I didn’t look pretty enough? How many times did I feel dejected for not getting “special attention,” naively unaware the costs of that attention for those on the receiving end?

It’s not about me, but…when I see the hundreds of “me too”s, I have survivor’s guilt– no one deserves to be treated that way, and I am certainly no better a person for escaping it. This is just another way that I am privileged.

It’s not about me, but…would my experience be different if I weren’t overweight and a somewhat shabby dresser? I think that a lot. I’m not the kind of person people generally flirt with, let alone harass. I didn’t have my first real kiss until my senior year in college. And yet, I also know sexual predators frequently take advantage of young girls (and boys) with low self-esteem– people who are so happy to have attention they convince themselves negative attention is the only kind they are worthy of.

It’s not about me, but…could it have been? Could I have been harassed and not even noticed because I assumed they weren’t talking to me? Has our body-shaming and looks-based society come to the point that women practically harass themselves?

If you are one of the many “me too”s, I’m sorry. I promise to raise my two sons to respect all individuals and to avoid making judgements based on looks or sexuality. I will call out harassment and abuse when I see it.

And if you need a shoulder to cry on, I’m here.

Now, back to your regularly scheduled blog about words and writing. Because creating beauty is what makes the pain worth it.